somnium-books
somnium-books:

Barbara Jones. The Unsophisticated Arts. First edition, 1951. The Architectural Press. Throughout the 1940s, Barbara Jones set about documenting the vernacular art of England; visiting fairgrounds, tattoo parlours, taxidermists, houseboats, high street shops, seaside piers and amusement arcades. This epic project culminated in this fabulous book full of photographs and cascades of beautiful black and white line drawings and colour plates. Dust wrapper a little worn with tape marks and a few chips with some light foxing internally, else a very good copy with very little wear. An absolute must have for English folk art fans.

somnium-books:

Barbara Jones. The Unsophisticated Arts. First edition, 1951. The Architectural Press. Throughout the 1940s, Barbara Jones set about documenting the vernacular art of England; visiting fairgrounds, tattoo parlours, taxidermists, houseboats, high street shops, seaside piers and amusement arcades. This epic project culminated in this fabulous book full of photographs and cascades of beautiful black and white line drawings and colour plates. Dust wrapper a little worn with tape marks and a few chips with some light foxing internally, else a very good copy with very little wear. An absolute must have for English folk art fans.

…A cold paralyzing horror: a glimpse into the subhuman…the sickness of life beginning again: the exhausting awareness of every ache. What the hand does in reaching, a misery of awareness; loss of memory in small things; hatred of necessary routines; hatred but not fear of dark; watching the skin, the fingers; overeating; a full preoccupation with unnecessary tasks; weakness in the morning; fear of headlights; distrust of children; a tide of loss.

Theodore Roethke, notebooks (I didn’t know about these!)

Straw for the Fire: From the Notebooks of Theodore Roethke

At his death, Pulitzer-prize winning poet Theodore Roethke left behind 277 spiral notebooks full of poetry fragments, aphorisms, jokes, memos, journal entries, random phrases, bits of dialog, commentary, and fugitive miscellany. Within these notebooks, Roethke’s mind roved freely, moving from the practical to the transcendental, from the halting to the sublime. Fellow poet and colleague David Wagoner distilled these notebooks—twelve linear feet of bookshelf—into a wise and rollicking collection that shows Roethke to be one of the truly phenomenal creative sources in American poetry.